Quote 21 Apr 748 notes
After some 30 years of [analyzing teaching], I have concluded that classroom teaching—particularly at the elementary and secondary levels—is perhaps the most complex, most challenging, and most demanding, subtle, nuanced, and frightening activity that our species has ever invented. In fact, when I compared the complexity of teaching with that much more highly rewarded profession, “doing medicine,” I concluded that the only time medicine even approaches the complexity of an average day of classroom teaching is in an emergency room during a natural disaster. When 30 patients want your attention at the same time, only then do you approach the complexity of the average classroom on an average day.
— The wisdom of practice: essays on teaching, learning and learning to teach Lee S. Shulman (via luckyseventeen)
Photo 21 Apr 805 notes nprfreshair:

Supercell thunderstorm photo by Ryan Shepard 

nprfreshair:

Supercell thunderstorm photo by Ryan Shepard 

via NPR.
Photo 21 Apr 12 notes lawnlife:

New Cabell - new look #uva #lawnlife

lawnlife:

New Cabell - new look #uva #lawnlife

Photo 20 Apr 502 notes mediumaevum:

Medieval Dances - The Egg Dance
The Egg dance was one of the earliest Saxon Medieval dances and, like the Carole, was performed during a period of festivity namely the Easter-tide festivities. The  egg dance was derived from a traditional Easter game, in the egg dance eggs were laid on the ground or floor and the goal was to dance among them damaging as few eggs as possible.
image: The Egg Dance by  Pieter Brueghel the Younger

mediumaevum:

Medieval Dances - The Egg Dance

The Egg dance was one of the earliest Saxon Medieval dances and, like the Carole, was performed during a period of festivity namely the Easter-tide festivities. The  egg dance was derived from a traditional Easter game, in the egg dance eggs were laid on the ground or floor and the goal was to dance among them damaging as few eggs as possible.

image: The Egg Dance by  Pieter Brueghel the Younger

Photo 20 Apr 45 notes annieforrest:

Painted Beta Bridge for Take Back the Night!!!

annieforrest:

Painted Beta Bridge for Take Back the Night!!!

Video 18 Apr 1,451 notes

mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)

Photo 18 Apr 22 notes publicdomainreview:

A lithograph from “Shtetl, My Destroyed Home: A Remembrance” (1922), a set of outstanding depictions by Russian artist Issachar Ber Ryback of his home village in Ukraine before it was destroyed in the pogroms following World War I. See more here: http://bit.ly/1eWVSWM

publicdomainreview:

A lithograph from “Shtetl, My Destroyed Home: A Remembrance” (1922), a set of outstanding depictions by Russian artist Issachar Ber Ryback of his home village in Ukraine before it was destroyed in the pogroms following World War I. See more here: http://bit.ly/1eWVSWM

Photo 18 Apr 431 notes ancientart:

A quick look at: Germanicus, a prominent Roman general of the early Empire, and the grandson-in-law of Augustus Caesar.
"Germanicus, too, that he might be the better known, took his helmet off his head and begged his men to follow up the slaughter, as they wanted not prisoners, and the utter destruction of the nation would be the only conclusion of the war. And now, late in the day, he withdrew one of his legions from the field, to intrench a camp, while the rest till nightfall glutted themselves with the enemy’s blood. Our cavalry fought with indecisive success." -Tacitus, Annals (2.26), via The Internet Classics Archive.
Germanicus Julius Caesar (15 BC-AD 19), usually just referred to as Germanicus, was a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty and the nephew and adopted son of Tiberius. He commanded 8 Roman legions on the Rhine frontier with distinction. He appears to have gained affection among the Roman people; Suetonius in Life of Caligula III describes his “…unexampled kindliness, and a remarkable desire and capacity for winning men’s regard and inspiring their affection." He died aged 33 on October 9 of AD 19, it was a suspected poisoning. 
Great honours were granted to Germanicus after his death and he was elevated to a god-like status:

[…] Five voting centuries were to be named after him; a curule chair was to be kept in the temple of the new god, the temples were to be closed on the day that Germanicus’ ashes were interred and sacrifices were to be made on that day each year at his tomb.
[…] In public, all due honours were granted to Germanicus. The only oddity was that Tiberius and his mother did not attend the internment. Some bad feeling may have been read into this by Germanicus’ supporters, but this would seem to be an over-reaction.
-Richard Alston in Aspects of Roman History AD 14–117, page 28.

Sculpture courtesy of & currently located at the Louvre, France. Photo taken by Jastrow. The sculpture dates to circa 40 AD, Accession number: Ma 1238.

ancientart:

A quick look at: Germanicus, a prominent Roman general of the early Empire, and the grandson-in-law of Augustus Caesar.

"Germanicus, too, that he might be the better known, took his helmet off his head and begged his men to follow up the slaughter, as they wanted not prisoners, and the utter destruction of the nation would be the only conclusion of the war. And now, late in the day, he withdrew one of his legions from the field, to intrench a camp, while the rest till nightfall glutted themselves with the enemy’s blood. Our cavalry fought with indecisive success." -Tacitus, Annals (2.26), via The Internet Classics Archive.

Germanicus Julius Caesar (15 BC-AD 19), usually just referred to as Germanicus, was a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty and the nephew and adopted son of Tiberius. He commanded 8 Roman legions on the Rhine frontier with distinction. He appears to have gained affection among the Roman people; Suetonius in Life of Caligula III describes his “…unexampled kindliness, and a remarkable desire and capacity for winning men’s regard and inspiring their affection." He died aged 33 on October 9 of AD 19, it was a suspected poisoning.

Great honours were granted to Germanicus after his death and he was elevated to a god-like status:

[…] Five voting centuries were to be named after him; a curule chair was to be kept in the temple of the new god, the temples were to be closed on the day that Germanicus’ ashes were interred and sacrifices were to be made on that day each year at his tomb.

[…] In public, all due honours were granted to Germanicus. The only oddity was that Tiberius and his mother did not attend the internment. Some bad feeling may have been read into this by Germanicus’ supporters, but this would seem to be an over-reaction.

-Richard Alston in Aspects of Roman History AD 14–117, page 28.

Sculpture courtesy of & currently located at the Louvre, France. Photo taken by Jastrow. The sculpture dates to circa 40 AD, Accession number: Ma 1238.

Video 15 Apr 344 notes

ancientart:

Seated divinity. Maya Culture, Rio Bec (?) or Chenes region, Mexico, Classic period. Made of polychrome stucco, dates to between circa 550 and circa 950.

Former collection of Jean Lions, 1970s; former collection of H. Law; auctioned by Binoche & Giquello on 21 March 2011. Photo taken by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

Photo 14 Apr 49 notes fyeahwomenartists:

raisedonsandwiches:

This could be your dish rack. Stay with me. Coming soon…

Sandwich Shop

fyeahwomenartists:

raisedonsandwiches:

This could be your dish rack. Stay with me. Coming soon…

Sandwich Shop


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